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SpainMalaga
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2021 4:43 am

Post by SpainMalaga » Thu Oct 14, 2021 7:15 pm

Sorry for my poor English and any errors in my message ... We are studying the possibility of buying a Honda e. Thanks for the contributions of the group in this forum that are already enough to give an idea of what can be achieved with this car. I have nothing clear after reading. I have a question about an interesting device for this car (230v converter). Has anyone made intensive use of the 230v converters? Do you think it can be used to continuously power an emergency circuit in a home during a power outage?

EEEE
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2021 10:33 am

Post by EEEE » Fri Oct 15, 2021 7:55 am

Hi,

First and foremost - it is probably not legal to connect an inverter to your fusebox without the appropriate lockout and controls. The reason for this is that in the event of a powercut or loss of supply, you would be back feeding the local circuit. You would need to (for common sense and safety, let alone legally), create a socket that is only connected to the fusebox when the mains supply is physically isolated. That way your invertor is not powering the service line (where it might kill someone trying to fix the fault).

You still have the practical pain of going to the car, turning it on, running a special extension cable (often called a suicide cable for obvious reasons), isolating your mains supply, then plugging it in and turning it on. It can not work as an active standby.

The car invertor is 1500w rated output. I wouldn't want to run it continuously at 1500w, but it should be able to run continuously at somewhere below that.

1500w will run quite a lot of normal household items, but nothing too heavy.

you could easily run most things:

TVs/console/normal PC/laptop etc.
house lights (assuming no massive chandeliers with 10x60w lol)
pumps/control/central heating if gas power.

you wouldn't be able to run:
Freezer (due to large initial current current)
Air-conditioning (too much current)
electric cooker (too much current)
Electrically heated shower (too much current)
Kettles
Toasters
Steam Irons.
Anything that makes lots of heat basically.

Probably not the best idea to do it, but if you were desperate it could be done... I would look into a solar grid tie system as you likely have plenty of sun (unlike the UK!)

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FDAD
Posts: 236
Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2020 1:55 pm
Location: Porto, Portugal

Post by FDAD » Fri Oct 15, 2021 12:23 pm

EEEE wrote:
Fri Oct 15, 2021 7:55 am
Hi,

First and foremost - it is probably not legal to connect an inverter to your fusebox without the appropriate lockout and controls. The reason for this is that in the event of a powercut or loss of supply, you would be back feeding the local circuit. You would need to (for common sense and safety, let alone legally), create a socket that is only connected to the fusebox when the mains supply is physically isolated. That way your invertor is not powering the service line (where it might kill someone trying to fix the fault).

You still have the practical pain of going to the car, turning it on, running a special extension cable (often called a suicide cable for obvious reasons), isolating your mains supply, then plugging it in and turning it on. It can not work as an active standby.

The car invertor is 1500w rated output. I wouldn't want to run it continuously at 1500w, but it should be able to run continuously at somewhere below that.

1500w will run quite a lot of normal household items, but nothing too heavy.

That's were the V2G that was supposed to be in the honda the solution to that problem. ;)
Honda E advance [Modern Steel Metallic] 8-) [DELIVERED JULY 2020] - 30 000Kms + 😌🎉

SpainMalaga
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2021 4:43 am

Post by SpainMalaga » Fri Oct 15, 2021 8:53 pm

Thanks for sharing your thought. Indeed I have an independent circuit that is fed from a pure wave UPS with a power of 1500w, but obviously it has a very limited capacity. If I unplug the UPS, that whole circuit loses power. It allows me to maintain internet connection, TV, ambient lighting for a few minutes. To avoid risks, as you indicate, I would try to connect the vehicle's socket to power that emergency circuit.
If someone on the forum had some experience of continuous operation and if the car allows it to be "on" delivering current for hours, or it turns off automatically. It would be a super UPS .... I am reading the vehicle manual to locate information on it.

This would be a mock up of the Honda Power Manager Concept (mini). I will continue to research and share the information I find with this forum.

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